Britain

Diversity on the Rise

multicultural britainmixed race uk

The world is becoming an unavoidably interconnected place.

People from opposite ends of the social spectrum now often come into contact.

Social boundaries are ever-changing, and though cultural barriers are still enforced in some instances, they are being broken down in others.

Many of us have become something we label as ‘global citizens,’ our identities made up of a complex combination of ethnicities, nationalities, religious beliefs and cultural practices.

No longer is a Brit necessarily Caucasian by ethnicity. And though rarely heard of, a Chinese citizen may not necessarily be of Chinese ethnicity in today’s world.

A result of all these things is an increase in people of mixed ethnicities – mixed race people.

Now the largest and fastest growing ethnic group in the UK, were we all to be bunched together.

Even if those who deem themselves as purely of one ethnic group look deep into their origins, it’s nearly impossible that they wouldn’t have mixed ethnic lineages somewhere down the line.

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Olympic Medalists Reflect Multicultural Britain

The endless debate about whether Multicultural Britain is working was silenced tonight as 3 Olympic gold medalists showed the value of a diversity.

3 Olympic Athletes from 3 different backgrounds win 3 gold medals.

Photo: adifansnet / Flickr


Jessica Ennis held her gold medal high for the Heptathlon, Greg Rutherford for long jump and Mo Farah became the first British man to win the Men’s 10,000m.

All three of them, including Somalian-born Mo Farah, were proud to represent Great Britain. “This is my country,” Mo Farah answered to a rather silly question – “Would you have been prouder to have done it for Somalia?”

The medalists visually and metaphorically symobolise how people from different backgrounds can flourish in the UK.

Most of the British public are feeling a great sense of pride over tonight’s victories, regardless of the ethnic backgrounds of the athletes.

And hopefully that pride will bring people in Britain closer together, long after the Olympics finish.