A stab in the back for the Gurkhas

The Ministry of Defence’s new wave of cuts will make more than one in ten Gurkha soldiers redundant, most likely from the older generation.

Photo (Jody-Lan Castle) : Here the Mayor of Folkestone, Susan Wallace, says Namaste to members of the Nepalese Community.Over 45,000 Gurkhas have died in battle to date in the name of Great Britain. They fought bravely alongside British troops in conflicts such as Kosovo, the Falklands, Afghanistan and the World Wars. But now, only 3 years after winning the Gurkha Justice Campaign, the Gurkhas are set to bear the brunt of the Ministry of Defence’s second round of cuts. The announcement came on Tuesday that the British Armed Forces will shed an extra 2,900 soldiers, including 400 Gurkhas, in its attempt to save £4.7billion.

Former Councillor of Folkestone in Kent, Dhan Gurung, has accused the Ministry of Defence of discrimination due to the disproportionate number of Gurkhas to be axed compared to their British counterparts. But according to Defence Minister Philip Hammond, the Strategic Defence and Security Review (SDSR) is necessary to clean up after the preceding Labour government’s overzealous defence spending.

The Defence Minister also commented that the review is likely to affect mostly Gurkhas who have already served for 6 years or more. The move also seems to intentionally target the older Gurkhas. The changes in the maximum years of service for Gurkhas, from 15 years to 22, mean that Gurkhas will remain in service until much older ages. So ironically, it is those who have served this country the longest that will be made redundant.

Though many Gurkhas currently fear for the future of their careers, there are attempts at keeping UK-Nepal relations strong on a local and national level. Nepalese Artist Ajaya Deshar is holding his exhibition In Search of Peace in Folkestone, Kent, home to over 350 Nepalese families and the 1st and 2nd Battalions of the Royal Gurkha Rifles. The exhibition’s opening ceremony brought the local and Nepalese communities together to share in the Nepalese culture.

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